Posts Tagged ‘ Netherlands ’

Holland Euro 2012 away kit

The Netherlands made the World Cup Final in 2010, narrowly losing to Spain in a match possibly more remembered for Nigel De Jong’s foot to Xabi Alonso’s sternum than the finish by Iniesta and the crowning glory of La Furia Roja. Following that defeat, the Oranje breezed through Euro 2012 Qualifying, only losing one match to Sweden after qualification had already been secured, and during the run they climbed to #1 in FIFA World Rankings.

Heading into the Euros, co-hosted by Ukraine and Poland, manager Bert van Marwijk had re-shaped the squad with about a third of the squad turned over. The Dutch rolled out a back line of van der Wiel, Heitinga, Vlaar and Willems with Mathijsen getting some time as well. The attacking group in the first two games featured Robben, Sneijder, Afellay and van Persie with de Jong and van Bommel holding.

After dropping their first two games, Holland could still advance and put most of their key attackers on the field with Van der Vaart and Huntelaar coming on and van Bommel and Afellay heading to the bench. An early goal gave hope to the Oranje but two goals from Cristiano Ronaldo saw the Dutch finish 0-3 and in last place.

As for the kits, the home shirt featured a two tone orange pattern that I didn’t care for and I loved the change shirt from Nike the moment I saw it. I love all black kits and this one by Nike was fantastic. The small deep orange band that came down the shirt provided a nice accent to the shirt while keeping the manufacturer logo in the same color as the shirt. Plus the KNVB badge was not framed in that weird shield used in previous iterations.

The Dutch wore the all black strip for the last group game and the shirt features a black ring collar, rubberized material at the seams and around the orange design feature, laser cut venting around the rib cage and a ventilated back. Nieuwe Meesters (New Masters) is on the inside neck and the bright Dutch orange is on the inside of the cuffs.

Another item I came across in my research was the name and number set. The name font is pretty common for the time but the numbers are quite, how do i say this, blocky. This image from the Switch Image Project shows what I’m talking about.
Despite my kit buying rules, when I saw a deal on Classic Football Shirts on the authentic version, I had to get it. I ordered a medium (maybe not a good long term decision as I age and put on the pounds) and it’s wonderful, bold shirt that weighs almost nothing.

——

Resources

Football Shirt Culture

Historical Football Kits

Colours of Football

Wikipedia

——

Check out more posts on kits from clubs and countries around the world on the Strip Club page. And yes. It’s safe for work.

American Outlaws

ao-atl

American Outlaws

I spent the weekend with the American Outlaws for the US Women’s National Team game against the Netherlands at the Georgia Dome. This was a great opportunity to learn more about the organization while taking in my first US Women’s National Team game.

Saturday night I hit Night Before event at RiRa, the official bar for American Outlaws Atlanta. Then Sunday I braved the rain for the AO Tailgate before heading into the match, which the USWNT won 3-1.

Find out more about American Outlaws at their website and visit Americans Outlaws Atalanta on facebook and twitter (@atlantaoutlaws).

Check out ATL Bobb’s twitter (@ATLBobb) and instagram and relive Jesse’s Copa America Centenario trip on MendoVision.

——

Thanks for listening! You can also subscribe via iTunes and please leave a rating and review. Follow me on twitter @austinlong1974.

Personal Kit Collection 2016

Inspired by a series of tweets late 2012, I took stock of my kit inventory and put together a post documenting my personal kit collection at the time. As you can see my collection was all over the place in terms of teams, manufacturer and style. Since then, I have had a couple of realizations (read: interventions) and talks with myself. Combine that with a big move and my collection is now under 30 jerseys. I have probably owned over 50 shirts through the years but things happen. My collection pales in comparison with others, especially JR Francis, as we discussed on one of his appearances on the SoccerNomad podcast, but I love collecting and talking about kits.

Manchester United

Home

IMAG0524

Away

IMAG0528 IMAG0530

US National Team

IMAG0504

National Teams

 IMAG0503

FC Barcelona

 IMAG0490

Juventus

IMAG0493

Atlanta Silverbacks

IMAG0491

My current plan is to follow my self-created rules.

  • Since I’ve narrowed my focus to just following Manchester United at club level (and Atlanta United when they take the field in 2017), only buying a shirt every three years or ones that match my tastes. I’m currently back filling my Manchester United collection.
  • In terms of national team kits, only buying ones of the United States Men’s National Team. Why? Because I’m American, if only by an accident of birthplace. (Of course, thanks to Nike, this policy has been a real problem as they keep designing crap shirts.)
  • Only buying personalized jerseys (printed with JUNIOR 7) and not buying “hero jerseys”.
  • Only buying shirts on sale (promotional or otherwise) or wait until the release of the following set of kits.

Since I put these into effect a couple of years ago, I have done quite well, only breaking the rules once, and that was to get an authentic Holland Away jersey from Euro 2012. It was 50% off at Classic Football Shirts and I couldn’t pass it up. However I’m close to breaking several of the above rules for the new Croatia Euro 2016 away shirt.

croatia-euro-2016-away-kit-3

For all the posts on kits that I have owned, own currently or want to own, please visit the Strip Club page of the SoccerNomad blog.

Here are some good resources, especially if you’re looking for vintage or retro shirts:

Feel free to share your faves/collections or great sites for shirts in the comments below.

Ajax, the Dutch, the War

51Yrb1G4BSL._SX314_BO1,204,203,200_

Ajax, the Dutch, the War, Simon Kuper

This book was enjoyable but I think would have gotten more out of it if I had a better knowledge of World War II and the cultural and political happenings of the Netherlands and Europe. The relationship with the Jews for the Europeans generally and some soccer clubs specifically, is a large part of book. Again I don’t have a good understanding on this topic. Finally, a deeper familiarity with the histories of Feyenoord and Ajax would have allowed those passages to have made more sense. Having said all that, I did learn a lot, including the fact that soccer did exist during the war, which surprised me.

Whereas Dynamo was more of a linear story about a specific story line of the war, Kuper bounces around Holland and Europe to share his information and interviews. The delineation between good and evil is explored and challenges the reader. My favorite part of the book was anecdotes about various players attempting to keep playing football during the war either by changing their identity or escaping or negotiating with Nazis.

Kuper’s prose tells a tale of a very dark time in human history, and the book is worth reading because it gives a greater context to the influence of World War II on the game, the Netherlands, and football clubs in that country.

Football Without Frontiers

Euro 2000 was one of the highlights of my soccer supporter experience, hitting heights of excitement and engagement, not matched until recently with the 2014 World Cup, while producing moments of style and quality over several weeks.

france

Part 1

Part 2

——

Check out more posts on my trips, research and memories on the MatchDay Memories page.

MatchDay Memory–Football Without Frontiers (Part 1)

Euro 2000 was one of the highlights of my soccer supporter experience, hitting heights of excitement and engagement, not matched until recently with the 2014 World Cup, while producing moments of style and quality over several weeks.

france

I have not always been a soccer guy.  Although I have been playing the game since I was eight, I knew more about the intricacies of the Big Three American sports (American football, baseball and basketball) than the beautiful game.

However, during a window in the late 90’s to early 2000’s, I turned from casual fan into full-on Soccer Nerd, as I was reading (shameless plug for Recommended Reading page), watching, coaching, buying kits (shameless plug for Strip Club page) and playing to a level that raised the game to an obsession (an unhealthy one my wife might add) in my life.

In those days, the tournament was only accessible via Pay Per View.  Remember those days?  No ESPN or Fox Sports1 or beIN Sports or Gol TV.  Hell this was still the days of Fox Sports World.  Anyway, the PPV package for Euro 2000 was something like $150, so I gathered some investors, hit PURCHASE and off we went.

I watched almost every game live.  With kickoffs at 12pm and 2:45pm Eastern Time, I could fit them in before heading off to the Pizza Slut.  And on top of that I taped them. As part of paying a portion of the PPV costs, people could borrow the tapes to stay up with the tournament.

VCR-1200

Remember VCR’s??  For a while crates of video cassettes followed me around until I realized that I was never going to watch them and most everything was on the internet anyway.  Speaking of the internet the internet was coming to the fore at that time, so I scoured the web every morning for news and updates to get greater context on the competition.

zinedinezidane

What I remember about this tournament was Zidane, the Dutch and the dramatic Spain versus Yugoslavia game.  Two years on from winning the World Cup, the French were even better.  Gone was Guivarc’h up top with Lemarre able to choose from Henry, Anelka and Trezeguet, plus Wiltord and Pires were added to the attack. But the indisputable star was Zidane.  If you watch any extended highlights of this tournament, you will inevitably see Zidane in amazing form and his performances are some of the finest examples ever of touch, vision and footwork.

holland

Their expected opponents in the Final were the Dutch, one of the co-hosts of the tournament.  Building on a strong performance in the 1998 World Cup, the Netherlands marched through the group and then absolutely annihilated Yugoslavia in the Quarter Finals 6-1.  Overmars, Zenden, Bergkamp and Kluivert attacking with Davids and Cocu cleaning up in front of strong defense.  Everything was going so well until the Semi Final against Italy.  The Dutch missed five penalties (two in regulation and three during the shootout) to be eliminated by the Azzurri, which meant that wonderful cycle of players never won anything at international level.

Special mention to Yugoslavia who produced the most drama and excitement and insanity of the tournament.  They were down 3-0 and down a man in their opening game to Slovenia. They drew 3-3.  The Yugoslavs looked to be winning the group and somehow threw it away.  If the ending of the 1999 Champions League Final was the greatest ending in soccer (dare I say sports) history, then the final minutes of Spain and Yugoslavia was a close second.

spain

Spain, needing a win to progress, fell behind three times to the Yugoslavs.  La Roja were down 3-2 in injury time and then a damn near miracle happened.  Spain converted a penalty and with seconds remaining in the match, the ball was launched into the penalty area.  No tiki taki here.  The loose ball fell to Pedro Munitis who drilled his shot into the ground and up and over the keeper to win the match and the group. Absolute pandemonium ensued as Yugoslavia thought they were out while Norway had their celebrations cut short.

In the Quarters the Netherlands tore them apart.  Yet this was a squad with Mihajlović, Stojković, Jugović, Mijatović and tournament top scorer Savo Milošević. Couldn’t take your eyes off them for second.

——

Check out more posts on my trips, research and memories on the MatchDay Memories page.

MatchDay Memory–1974: Part 4 (1974 World Cup)

Forty years ago I came into the world and while I may not have made an impact on the game of soccer, it has surely made an impact on me.  Playing the game from a very early age, I didn’t start following the game until my early 20’s.  Starting with Manchester United, I eventually started reading everything I could get my hands on and watching whatever game was on, learning about the rich and complex history of the game.  My MatchDay Memory posts over the next few weeks will focus on events in world soccer during the year of my birth, 1974.  It is in no way a comprehensive summation but rather an examination of teams and incidents that I was drawn to in my research.

——

The 1974 World Cup was held in West Germany and saw a new format, a new trophy and lots of rain.  The 16 participants were divided into four groups of four with the top two advancing to the next stage of two groups of four.  The winners of each group contested the World Cup Final.  David Goldblatt called the 1974 edition “the tipping point” as the convergence of a new President with new ideas (Joao Havelange) and a commercially savvy sports company (adidas), saw the tournament become a worldwide event.

Of the 16 teams at the Finals, 9 were from UEFA, which struck me as uneven and puts the current 32 team tournament into perspective.  Scotland did not lose a match but were eliminated on goal difference, while Italy failed to progress after losing to Poland in the final group game, and Bulgaria could only get draws in their opening two fixtures before suffering a heavy loss to Holland.

West Germany, Holland, Yugoslavia, East Germany, Sweden and Poland progressed to the next stage with Poland proving to be one of the surprises of the tournament.  Three wins out of three in the first phase saw them move forward, but a 1-0 loss to West Germany in the final group game of the second stage eliminated them and sent the hosts to the Final. In watching the Official FIFA video of this tournament, West Germany had entertaining games in the second group stage–4-2 against Sweden and a dramatic 1-0 win over Poland, which saw the West Germans wear an unusual strip of all white.

Holland progressed to the Final, using the Total Football mentioned in the opening post in this series.  The website 4dfoot.com went into greater detail, focusing on the Brazil match, which Holland won 2-0.

Holland’s tactics were aimed at making life as hard as possible for Brazil . . . Holland made the pitch as small as possible. . . by pressing forward as a team. The attackers would be the first to press, and the midfielders and defenders were close behind. This required defenders to push up high and leave a large gap behind the defense. Holland prevented Brazil from profiting from that space by making excellent use of the offside trap and have the goalie act as an emergency sweeper. It worked brilliantly.

The Final matched West Germany and Holland and research in this area proved particularly compelling. I came across several articles that went beyond the score to reveal the context of the tournament, particularly for these two teams.  Starting with ripples from World War II, two of my favorite writers, Uli Hesse and Simon Kuper, examined the psyches of each country.  Their thoughts were fascinating and shed an interesting light on the games over the years.

Niklas Wildhagen wrote an intriguing article on the many issues in the background for the two Finalists.  One point he made was how the Dutch went to the tournament at less than 100%, but coach Rinus Michaels had forged a team in great form.  However the relaxed atmosphere in the Dutch camp was unbalanced the night before the Final by a newspaper article with the headline Cruyff, Champagne and Naked Girls. A final element mentioned by Chris Hunt was that the theme of the tournament was money—win bonuses and sponsorship deals being particularly big issues.  In the end the hosts won the Final 2-1.  The West Germans survived a very early goal by the Dutch, equalized and eventually went ahead.  A great Dutch team had been stopped by the resolve of the Germans, who won their second World Cup.

1974winner

——

I chose 1974 simply because it was the year I was born, yet in reviewing the events of those 12 months it was interesting to see how many precursors and foundations and glimpses into the future were present.  The eternal battle between disciplined defenses against attack minded opponents; players and clubs searching for the next dollar/euro/monetary unit; shock results;  the constant emergence of new and dynamic talent from all around the world.  In 1974 I imagine that there were unknown pockets of activity around the world, complete with rich storylines and regional influence, and stories these days are now part of the worldwide narrative thanks to the internet and globalization.  Teams, players, coaches and cultures are more familiar and are part of a global fabric, with the game belonging to the world and being shared with the world.  Part of the sharing is this project, which was hard work, but informative and enlightening, and I hope you have enjoyed this look back into footballing history.

——

Bibliography

MatchDay Memory–1974: Part 1 (Johan Cruyff)

Forty years ago I came into the world and while I may not have made an impact on the game of soccer, it has surely made an impact on me.  Playing the game from a very early age, I didn’t start following the game until my early 20’s.  Starting with Manchester United, I eventually started reading everything I could get my hands on and watching whatever game was on, learning about the rich and complex history of the game.  My MatchDay Memory posts over the next few weeks will focus on events in world soccer during the year of my birth, 1974.  It is in no way a comprehensive summation but rather an examination of teams and incidents that I was drawn to in my research.

——

Starting my journey in Europe, the 1970’s saw the emergence of Total Football.  A post at Football Bible traces the path of footballing principles from England to Holland, focusing on Jimmy Hogan in the early 1900’s to Jack Reynolds at Ajax.  Former player turned manager Rinus Michaels laid the foundations at the Dutch club for unprecedented levels of success, and this style of play changed the game in terms of pressure, possession and spacing and continues to impact the game today.

David Winner spends a chapter diving into Total Football in his wonderful book Brilliant Orange.  Based on his interviews with many members of the Ajax and Dutch teams of the era, the system developed as a way to have a team instinctively know how and where to move to create space and press the ball in order to dominate matches.  The chapter makes the case that it was a collaborative effort between coaches and players and the more everyone engaged the system, the better it got.

CRuyff-standing

The post at Football Bible also identified an intelligent midfielder as key to making the system work.  For Ajax and the Netherlands, that player was Johan Cruyff.  After three consecutive European Cups (1971-73) with Ajax, Cruyff was transferred to Barcelona in August of 1973.  In reading Chris Clement’s recap of the season for Estadios de Futbol en Espana, I was stunned to read the following passage:

Faced with a veritable can of worms, the Federation relented and allowed clubs to sign two overseas players from the start of the 1973-74 season. Anticipating the change, Real Madrid reached an agreement with Ajax for Johan Cruyff, but the world’s best player would have nothing to do with the deal that had been agreed behind his back. Sensing an opportunity, Barcelona moved in and on 13 August 1973, Cruyff signed for the Catalan giants. As news of the agreement of Real Madrid and Ajax’s deal surfaced, the RFEF refused to sanction the deal and memories of the controversial Di Stéfano transfer resurfaced. However, Barcelona and Cruyff stood firm and eventually, eight weeks into the season, Barça got their man.

To think how close Cruyff was to wearing white instead of the blaugrana.  Reading Barca: A People’s Passion by Jimmy Burns, I was struck by how Cruyff’s signing was not only a sporting coup, but was, maybe even more importantly, a political statement.  The transfer had been in the works for a couple of years and the amendment by the Spanish Football Federation finally allowed the move to take place.  In October 1973, the Dutchman appeared in the blaugrana colors for an official match, and FCB President Montal had his signature signing, and the fans could now cheer for one of the best players in the world at Camp Nou.

After a successful period during the 1950’s, Barca had suffered during the 1960’s, winning only one league title during the decade.  After a slow start to the 73/74 campaign, FCB climbed up the table, winning 20 of their last 28 matches, including a 5-0 demolition of Real Madrid at the Bernabeu, to claim the championship.  A post from Alex Mott for Football Espana recaps an amazing period in which Cruyff won a European Cup with Ajax, led FC Barcelona to the title and appeared in the World Cup Final with a series of dazzling displays.

However, after delivering La Liga in 1974, further success did not follow.  A combination of a poor coaching relationship, a fractured locker room and the absence of players able to perform Total Football saw Barca return to trophyless seasons and Cruyff left in 1978.  Burns ends his chapter entitled the Flying Dutchman with these quotes from Cruyff:

It is a challenge but you know when people cheer you on a Sunday when you do well and you win, it means more to them than simply the pleasure of winning.  It’s not just a game, football; it’s not just about the people on the terraces.  But you know what struck me most when we won the championship?  They didn’t say, “Congratulations.”  They said, “Thank you” That made a very deep impression.

Cruyff playing at Barca still impacts the club.  He later coached the team in the early 90’s, overseeing the Dream Team that won four straight La Liga titles in the early 90’s and the European Cup at Wembley in 1992.  A key player on that team was Pep Guardiola, who as manager would deliver another amazing cycle of success in the 2000’s. The Dutchman continues to wield power at the club, influencing decisions and offering his opinions.  A polarizing figure, it’s hard to argue his contribution to the Spanish giants.

——

I chose 1974 simply because it was the year I was born, yet in reviewing the events of those 12 months it was interesting to see how many precursors and foundations and glimpses into the future were present.  The eternal battle between disciplined defenses against attack minded opponents; players and clubs searching for the next dollar/euro/monetary unit; shock results;  the constant emergence of new and dynamic talent from all around the world.  In 1974 I imagine that there were unknown pockets of activity around the world, complete with rich storylines and regional influence, and stories these days are now part of the worldwide narrative thanks to the internet and globalization.  Teams, players, coaches and cultures are more familiar and are part of a global fabric, with the game belonging to the world and being shared with the world.  Part of the sharing is this project, which was hard work, but informative and enlightening, and I hope you have enjoyed this look back into footballing history.

——

Bibliography

Strip Club–Personal Kit Collection

Ever since I started following the Beautiful Game, I have loved kits. Different than American jerseys, they seemed so exotic with different designs and shirt sponsors. I started buying ones I could find in the mid-90s and haven’t stopped. However, I have had to create some rules now that I am a family man. Of course, they say rules are meant to be broken, but a couple of years ago, as a means of managing my kit habit, I made the following self-imposed guidelines:

  • I would only buy a club or international kit every three years.
  • I would only buy international kits of the United States Men’s National Team.  Why?  Because I’m American, if only by an accident of birthplace.
  • I would not buy “hero jerseys”.  If they were personalized, then it would be with me—JUNIOR 7.
  • I would not buy kits at full price.  Instead I would buy them on sale (promotional or otherwise) or wait until the release of the following set of kits.

With that mind, inspired by twitter, I took pictures of my kits.  I believe they are in chronological order by category.  Feel free to share your comments.

Manchester United

manchester united

FC Barcelona

fc barcelona

Juventus FC

juventus

National Teams

national teams

Miscellaneous

misc

 

——

Please visit my Strip Club page as I review each of the kits plus jerseys I would love to own.  Please feel free to share your comments about the kits I have reviewed or your favorites.  Also, you can follow me on twitter @AustinLong1974.

 

 

Strip Club–House Dancer Edition

At Euro 1996 I saw England destroy the Dutch 4-1 and dismissed them, but then I fell in love with Holland at the 1998 World Cup.  I enjoyed the way the Oranje played, with Davids and Cocu and Kluivert and Overmars and Bergkamp, who scored that fantastic goal against Argentina, and couldn’t wait for a final between Holland and France, but Brazil ruined that.  Two years on, I saw them sweep through the competition on home soil, including great games against France and the destruction of Yugoslavia before they fell to Italy on penalties.

AVEIRO, PORTUGAL - JUNE 19: Ruud Van Nistelrooy of Holland celebrates after scoring the second goal during the UEFA Euro 2004, Group D match between Holland and the Czech Rep at the Municiple de Aveiro Stadium on June 19, 2004 in Aveiro, Portugal. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Ruud Van Nistelrooy

Somehow they did not qualify for the 2002 World Cup so my next chance to really watch them was in Portugal at Euro 2004, pitted against Germany, the Czech Republic and Latvia.  One of the best matches of the entire tournament was Holland against the Czech Republic (start at 4:01 of video), which featured the little and large combo up top of Baros and Koller, with Rosicky pulling the strings behind, plus Smicer and Poborsky and Nedved in the midfield. Holland came out on fire and were up 2-0 in the first 20 minutes after a headed goal from Bouma and a manipulation of the offside rule by Ruud van Nistelrooy.  The Czechs were able to pull one back as Holland tried to kill off the game in the second half, but Davids hit the post and RvN was denied by Petr Cech.  The moments after were truly magical as Koller chested down a cross for Baros to volley home and then minutes later, Smicer tapped in from close range after Van der Sar could only parry a shot and Poborsky unselfishly squared for his teammate.

51004385

In the other group games, Van Nistelrooy scored an amazing header against Germany to share the points, and then Holland crushed Latvia in the final group game to earn a place in the knockout round.  I don’t really remember much from the quarterfinal with Sweden that ended with Holland prevailing on penalties.  The Dutch again went down in the semis as an absolutely stunning goal from Maniche put the Portuguese 2-0 up and into the Final on home soil.

netherlands-2004

netherlands-2004-change

(images courtesy of Historical Kits)

These jerseys were another eBay special, getting both the home and away for a ridiculous price.  Again they are not 100% authentic, based on my research, but are pretty close.  Nike has done a good job with the Dutch kit over the years, and I love this template from Nike, which is one of their best efforts.  With the breastplate template and number centered and circled, the jerseys are class. Also the material is very light and breathes pretty well.  Unfortunately I ordered the wrong size so on a windy day I’m blown all over the field as the shirt acts as a wind sock but that’s my only complaint.

As I got ready to move to Atlanta, I went through my kit collection. While I loved these shirts and they had served me well through the years, I gave them to fellow soccer lover and groundhopper and podcast guest, Alex Baker. Hup Holland!!