Posts Tagged ‘ Lotto ’

Personal Kit Collection 2016

Inspired by a series of tweets late 2012, I took stock of my kit inventory and put together a post documenting my personal kit collection at the time. As you can see my collection was all over the place in terms of teams, manufacturer and style. Since then, I have had a couple of realizations (read: interventions) and talks with myself. Combine that with a big move and my collection is now under 30 jerseys. I have probably owned over 50 shirts through the years but things happen. My collection pales in comparison with others, especially JR Francis, as we discussed on one of his appearances on the SoccerNomad podcast, but I love collecting and talking about kits.

Manchester United

Home

IMAG0524

Away

IMAG0528 IMAG0530

US National Team

IMAG0504

National Teams

 IMAG0503

FC Barcelona

 IMAG0490

Juventus

IMAG0493

Atlanta Silverbacks

IMAG0491

My current plan is to follow my self-created rules.

  • Since I’ve narrowed my focus to just following Manchester United at club level (and Atlanta United when they take the field in 2017), only buying a shirt every three years or ones that match my tastes. I’m currently back filling my Manchester United collection.
  • In terms of national team kits, only buying ones of the United States Men’s National Team. Why? Because I’m American, if only by an accident of birthplace. (Of course, thanks to Nike, this policy has been a real problem as they keep designing crap shirts.)
  • Only buying personalized jerseys (printed with JUNIOR 7) and not buying “hero jerseys”.
  • Only buying shirts on sale (promotional or otherwise) or wait until the release of the following set of kits.

Since I put these into effect a couple of years ago, I have done quite well, only breaking the rules once, and that was to get an authentic Holland Away jersey from Euro 2012. It was 50% off at Classic Football Shirts and I couldn’t pass it up. However I’m close to breaking several of the above rules for the new Croatia Euro 2016 away shirt.

croatia-euro-2016-away-kit-3

For all the posts on kits that I have owned, own currently or want to own, please visit the Strip Club page of the SoccerNomad blog.

Here are some good resources, especially if you’re looking for vintage or retro shirts:

Feel free to share your faves/collections or great sites for shirts in the comments below.

Strip Club–Pole Work Edition

I admit I was strangely gutted when Croatia lost to Germany in the quarterfinals of Euro 96 despite knowing almost nothing about them, but when I first saw the Croatia jersey, I was instantly intrigued, because they looked like the Big Boy outfit down the street. So I started following the team and through them found a basketball hero in Toni Kukoc. For this post I racked my brain and checked out the interwebs for more info, including the Croatian National Team Wikipedia entry.

On September 4th, 1994, Croatia kicked off against Estonia and started an amazing four year run in international football. The Blazers qualified for Euro 96 by winning their group, only losing one match and managing a draw and victory against 1994 World Cup Runners-Up Italy. At the Finals, they finished second in their section to Portugal (watch Suker’s goal against Denmark starts at 3:30) and qualified for the knockout stage, where they lost to Germany despite a sick goal by Suker.

Two years on, they took the world by storm as they made it all the way to the semi-finals of the World Cup, which included a 3-0 demolition of Germany, before they fell to two unlikely goals from Lillian Thuram of the host country France. They responded by defeating Holland in the third place game to complete a journey from non-existence to the heights of international competition, with Suker winning the Golden Boot for the tournament (all goals here). However, things didn’t go as well for the next decade as Suker, Boban, Prosinečki and Bilic retired, and the next generation couldn’t match their achievements.

The summer after Euro 96, I was at my local soccer shop and came across the Croatian jersey. I couldn’t believe it. I immediately took the shirt up to the counter and swiped my credit card. The jersey is one of the few I have that is made by Lotto, but it is lightweight and great to play in.

Of course I get mocked due to the large checked pattern (either something about Big Boy or wearing a picnic blanket) but that’s because people don’t get it.

Croatia continue to produce quality players (Modric, Rakitić, and Srna, with Kovačić as a possible up and comer) and I enjoy watching them. I pull for them in any tournament to do well, due to their ability and killer uniforms, so here’s hoping that they qualify for World Cup 2014 and beyond.

——

Special thanks for Kire Football Kits for the graphic reproduction of the kits.

Strip Club–Private Dance Edition

Juventus_team_2001_02

2002 was one of the peaks of my football consumption. My wife and I had been married just over a year as that season came to a close, and we had rented the upstairs of a house in downtown Lansing that was, how shall we say, quaint, but it had cable, including Fox Soccer Channel, and that’s all that mattered to me.  Cable was a luxury that would be sacrificed after the birth of our child and moving into a house of our own.

The run-in to that season saw Arsenal stun United at Old Trafford 1-0 to win the title; Valencia win La Liga for the first time since 1971; Real Madrid crush Leverkusen’s dreams hopes for European glory with a memorable strike from Zidane; but most of all it saw Juventus go for the double in Italy.

david_trezeguet

Heading into that campaign, the Old Lady strengthened their squad by signing Buffon, Thuram, Nedved, and Salas (totally forgot he played for Juve), adding to David Trezeguet the year before. Without a title since 1998, Juventus won their 26th Scudetto after Inter threw it away on the last day of the season. Led by Trezeguet’s 24 goals, the Bianconeri nearly won the double, falling to Parma on away goals in the Coppa Italia Final after winning 2-1 in Turin and losing 1-0 at the Tardini. In the Champions League they breezed through the opening group stage (remember the five minutes in Champions League history when there were two group stages before the quarters?) before being drawn into a tough with Bayer Leverkusen, Deportivo La Coruna and Arsenal. Look at the final table and how competitive it was.

Team

Pld

W

D

L

GF

GA

GD

Pts

 Bayer Leverkusen

6

3

1

2

11

11

0

10

 Deportivo La Coruña

6

3

1

2

7

6

+1

10

 Arsenal

6

2

1

3

8

8

0

7

 Juventus

6

2

1

3

7

8

−1

7

Bayer would go on to the final and Arsenal won the Premier League, while Depor would fall to Manchester United. Earning one point against Depor is what scuppered the Old Lady’s chances of progression.

juve away 2003

I couldn’t find a clean pic of the jersey (see above for a pic that I took), much less in long sleeves, so I refer to you to Colours of Football.

ita_juventus_2_0102

I really hated the kits of the Lotto years (the only other one Lotto got right was the silver jersey of 2000-01), but I remember seeing Juventus run out against Celtic in the all black strip, and I was instantly in lust.  Anyway, what a game, 4-3 to the Scottish team. I found this highlights package, including the goals and the panel remembering that night.  Tough loss but what a game and what an atomsphere.

The jersey was great, with the Lotto patches on the sleeves usually looking out of place, but, in this case, providing a nice accent. The jersey held up well after ten years and I loved wearing it on cool nights. My only complaint is that the cuffs were too big. This one became another victim of my kit purge and I passed it on to Peter Alegri, a lifetime Juventino. Forza Juve!!