Posts Tagged ‘ Coppa Italia ’

Juventus Home Shirt 08/09

Juventus’ first season back after the Calciopoli scandal was a relative success, with the Old Lady finishing third and qualifying for the Champions League. The following season, the club improved on their position while giving a good account of themselves in Europe.

The playing staff saw turnover ahead of the 2008/09 campaign with Birindelli leaving the club after a decade of service and almost 300 appearances. Zalayeta also departed, although his career never hit the anticipated heights. To help reinforce the squad, Mellberg, Amauri, and Poulsen were signed and Marchisio and Giovinco returned from loan.

The Bianconeri challenged for the scudetto before falling away in the spring, which eventually cost Ranieri his job. Alessandro Del Piero led the way with 13 league goals, supported by Amauri and Iaquinta, with Trezeguet out for most of the season. In the Coppa Italia, Juventus overcame Catania and Napoli before losing out to Lazio in the Semi-Finals. The Biancocelesti would go on to win their fifth Coppa title.

Juve were back in the Champions League and, after breezing through the Qualifying Round (5-1 over Artmedia Petržalka), the Bianconeri met Real Madrid on Match Days 3 and 4, winning both matches. The Old Lady won the home match 2-1 and then went to the Bernabeu where Alessandro Del Piero turned in a performance for the ages, scoring both goals. The Black and Whites topped the group but fell to Chelsea in the Round of 16.

Juventus 2-1

Real Madrid 0-2 Juventus

Moving on to the kits, Nike took over the contract for the Italian club in 2003 and had it until adidas became the manufacturer in 2015. This one was a solid effort, not the best but far from the worst, with the 06/07 and 14/15 versions the best in my opinion.

Juventus’ traditional black and white stripes were accented by bright yellow accents at the collar, cuffs and bottom hem. Yellow was used instead of the red from the previous season and I preferred this look, so much that I bought a replica version. The cuffs and hem were particularly interesting as the yellow bits were sown on under the main fabric to create a flare effect. There several different iterations of the kit as it was worn with white shorts and socks, white shorts and black socks and black shorts and socks. Have to say I liked this last version the best.

The replica had an embroidered crest with a thick heat transfer of the New Holland logo. There were some additional touches with the word BIANCONERI and two stars on the inside neck tape and JUVENTUS in gold across back neck.

As I was researching I noted that the league version of the shirt had stripes throughout the back of the shirt while the Champions League version had a black box for the name and number set. At first I thought I was imagining things but the Switch Image Project confirmed this slight alteration.

I ordered this shirt with JUNIOR 7 on the back. While I don’t wear it as much as I used to (read why here), it still hangs in my closet and maybe one day I’ll get it framed for the mancave I dream/talk about.

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Resources

Wikipedia

Colours of Football

Switch Image Project

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Check out more posts on kits from clubs and countries around the world on the Strip Club page. And yes. It’s safe for work.

Juventus: A History in Black and White

juve book

Juventus: A History in Black and White

Juventus is one of the most storied clubs in Italy and author Adam Digby does a wonderful job tracing the history of the club.

Starting with the early days of Italian football as it moved from regional leagues to a unified national league to the first period of success for Juvenuts during the 30’s, Digby recounts how the club rose again due to the emergence of the devastating strike force of Charles, Sivori and Boniperti and soared still further under the management of Trapattoni in the 70’s and 80’s. The 90’s saw another golden period which came to a crushing end due to Calciopoli before the Old Lady returned to the top with a new generation of players and the intensity of Conte.

Digby highlights the key protagonists in the club’s history, illustrating how their arrival, performance and demeanor helped shape the club. Things didn’t always go well for the club on the field or in the boardroom and Digby addresses these times. Whenever La Madama struggled a new hero would arise to help lead the team to success and maintain the Juventus spirit.

Digby is a lifelong Juventino and his passion comes through int he book, so it is not an absolutely objective account, but I consider it a strength and the book is a great introduction to the club and I recommend it if you want to learn about one of greats of world football and some critical moments in Italian football history.

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For a full list of my book reviews, please visit the Recommended Reading page. And reach out to me with your suggestions as well.

Strip Club–One Way Contact Edition

The Old Lady of Italian football came into the 2005/06 season as the defending Serie A champs with an amazing collection of talent: Buffon, Vieira, Emerson, Ibrahimović, Del Piero, Nedvěd, Zambrotta, Camoranesi,  Trezeguet, Mutu, Thuram and Cannavaro plus future stars Chiellini, Marchisio and Balzaretti.  The Black and Whites only lost one league match the entire season in defense of their title.

juve-serie-a

Although they had a 10 point lead over Inter and a 12 point advantage over Milan at the halfway point, the title chase went all the way to the end.  With eight matches to go, Juventus were still nine points ahead of Milan but a series of five draws from the Bianconeri in rounds 31 to 35 allowed the Rossoneri to close the gap and, with three matches to go, the lead had shrunk to just three points. Both teams won out and Juventus secured their 29th domestic title.

2006-05-14-juve-in

Success was not found in the Coppa, as the club lost to Roma in the Quarters on away goals. The tenth victory and the accompanying silver star continue to elude the Italian giants. In the Champions League, the team stormed to the top of a group with Bayern Munich, Club Brugge and Rapid Wien, winning five of the six games.  The Italian champs overcame Werder Bremen on away goals in the Round of 16 and then met Arsenal in the Quarters.  Viera’s return to Highbury was a disaster.  Missing ADP and Nedved, the team surrendered two goals and suffered two red cards.  The teams played out a 0-0 draw in Turin and the Old Lady was out.

Juventus_turyn_sezon_2005_06_original_originalUnfortunately the Calciopoli scandal broke after the season, and the club was stripped of their most recent titles.  Several key players left the squad and those that remained had to fight their way back out of Serie B in the 2006/07 season.  Watching the highlights from that season, the dynamism of the team is stunning to watch and I wonder what would have happened had that team been able to stay together.

cheap-sale-rare-2005-06-nike-juventus-jersey-kit-1202-28-HshOnline@21 ita_juventus_2_0506

I really like this jersey due to its uniqueness in the pantheon of Juventus kits.  Based on a Wikipedia page provided by Adam Digby (Super Juventus Fan and author of Juventus: A History in Black & White,) red has not been used as the base for a Juventus strip.  Nike designed a jersey using the colors of the Italian flag and the shirt also notes 100 years since their first scudetti win on the front center of the shirt. Unfortunately mine is a knockoff from eBay, and I’m not sure what the material is but the shield is peeling off and the shirt doesn’t breathe at all. On the plus side it’s a hero jersey with Del Piero #10 on the back. Regardless of the quality, I love the red, I love the history and I love Del Piero.

Del_Piero_2cs

Strip Club–Extras Edition

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I’m a Juventus guy and it took a lot of lubrication (read Honey Brown, Newcastle, and Summer Shandy) to get me through this post, but I felt I had to get this out.

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Inter entered the 2010-11 campaign as the kings of Italy and Europe.  Mourinho had led the club to a historic treble that included the elimination of FC Barcelona in the semis of the Champions League (thank you volcanic ash) before a comprehensive victory over Bayern Munich in Final.

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Of course the Special One left shortly after lifting the European Cup to attack his next challenge with Real Madrid.  Enter Rafael Benitez.  After relatively successful stints at Valencia and Liverpool, Rafa would take the reins of a team looking to stamp their authority in all competitions.

finale_coppa_italia_2011

The Spaniard only lasted until December as poor form in the league could not make up for winning the Italian Super Cup and FIFA Club World Championship.  Leonardo took over, leading the Nerazzurri all the way up to second in the league and another Coppa triumph against Palmero.  However in the Champions League, Schalke hammered the Italians in the quarter-finals, winning 5-2 at San Siro and 2-1 at home.

ita_inter_2_1011

Their away kit for the 2010-11 season is stunning.  But divisive.  Comment threads across the interwebs sway between the extremes of love and hate.  I fall in the love category.  I have a knockoff away jersey from a couple of years ago that is simple and elegant in all white.  This top takes that basic, beautiful foundation and adds the sinister symbol of the city of Milan and the club Internazionale—the serpent.

inter

From the Inter Milan Wikipedia page:

Animals are often used to represent football clubs in Italy, the grass snake, called Il biscione or Serpente representing Inter. The snake is an important symbol for the city of Milan, appearing often in Milanese heraldry as a coiled viper with a man in its jaws. The symbol is famous for its presence on the coat of arms of the House of Sforza (who ruled over Italy from Milan during the Renaissance period), the city of Milan, the historical Duchy of Milan (a 400 year state of the Holy Roman Empire), and Insubria (a historical regional area which the city of Milan falls within).

Inter_away10_p1

The entire strip is clean and sharp, and this post from Soccer Bible has some nice pictures and descriptions.  I haven’t done any searching for this jersey, but if I could find a really good deal on it, I might consider buying it.  I may not ever wear it, but just having it hanging in my closet might be enough.  Yes.  I know. I have issues.

Old Futbol Buffet–Team of Destiny

I became an atheist shortly after 5pm EDT on Saturday.  How?  Why?  The 2012 Champions League Final.  How could a supreme being let a team of over-aged, racist, manipulating, selfish, underhanded players win one of the biggest trophies on the planet?  Not only win but consign Spurs to the secondary European competition and start a probable fire sale?  Not only win but beat their opponents on their home field to complete a horror treble (second in the league, runner up in the domestic cup, runner up in the Champions League Final) a la Bayer Leverkusen in 2002?  Not only win but let a disgraced captain—who hacked down an opponent in the semis to rule himself out of the game, who is up on charges of racism, who slept with a teammate’s significant other—lift a trophy of the highest order in football?

That first sentence was purely hyperbole for this post.  I disavowed God years ago.

I have no idea what happened in the game in terms of tactics and personnel.  I was at a bar with over 50 soccer supporters, drinking and ranting and yelling and taking pics and trying not to pull my ample hair out.  The first half flew by and was more entertaining than I thought it was going to be. Chelsea actually came into the game towards the end and were the best team for the last ten minutes.  A critical moment occurred when Gomez received the ball, beat Cahill and then blasted the ball into the stands.

The second half reverted to the typical script. Barcelona, Bayern, whoever, dominated Chelsea but couldn’t break them down; Drogba became isolated; time ticked away.  I kept screaming at the screen for Munich to start crossing the ball, to start challenging the Chelsea rearguard.  Guess what?  They crossed the ball in for Muller to head home, a goal that had been coming for him.  Immediately Heynckes subbed in Van Buyten for Muller.  Made sense at the time but looking back that might have been the turning point.  Five minutes later, Chelsea had their only corner kick of the match, and of course Drogba got away from his defender to score.  On to extra time.

Basically Drogba committed two penalties in the last two Champions League games and got away with it.  His foul on Ribery was idiotic.  One, what was he doing in the box?  Two, what did he hope to accomplish?  Three, how could he have been so stupid?  Robben’s penalty was horrible.  Well struck but not nearly accurate enough.  As someone tweeted:  all those Germans and they let the Dutchmen take the penalty.  After that there was only one result: The Team of Destiny would beat the Team at Home.  I tweeted that and resigned myself to a Chelsea victory in the shootout.

Not much to say about the penalties other than Schweini missed his and that was that.  Epic against Real Madrid, he didn’t strike it well enough and allowed Drogba to step forward and seize the moment, which he duly did, sending Neuer the wrong way before sprinting the length of the field, ripping his jersey off and soaking up the adulation.

Chelsea—sixth in the league, on the umpteenth manager in the Abramovich era, still in need of squad renewal—are European Champions.  Those are the facts.  I can’t change them, no matter how much I want to.  All this game revealed to me is that I’m snakebitten this season.  Just that simple.  Barcelona went down to Real Madrid and Chelski; Manchester United had the title pried from their fingers in 120 seconds on #Survival Sunday; Juventus won the scudetto only after I stopped paying attention after four years of hardcore support.  So now my strategy for the Euros is to root for Portugal, ensuring that this group of talented but brain dead players can’t win the competition.

When in doubt, I refer to Zonal Marking for analysis.  ZM’s secret identity (Michael Cox) wrote this post for the Guardian shortly after the final whistle, identifying the key trends in movement and player choices, noting that Muller and Mata were critical the match.  As for the final result, the substitutes proved the difference.

Roger Bennett (@rogbennett) summed up the game as only he can with witty and incisive and confusing comparisons and metaphors, while noting that Cech had been researching Bayern penalties since 2007 (diving correctly on all six, saving three), but he hit the proverbial nail on the head towards the end of his post:

This cup was won by repeatedly summoning glory out of the jaws of defeat through collective endeavor, resilience in adversity, indefatigable belief and gutsy pragmatism. The public profile of some of its players may make Chelsea tough to love, but its achievement is hard not to admire.

Jonathon Wilson broke down the tactics of the game, noting that both teams got their formations right but the difference was in execution.  Both teams were without key players which forced interesting changes, with both teams coping—Bertrand doing admirably in such a big game and Muller and Robben swapping positions as examples—but Bayern didn’t convert their chances, Gomez being the notable scapegoat.  Chelsea rode their luck, made their chance count and then Cech did the rest.

Raphael Honigstein was in Munich for another Final Failure for Bayern Munich, as memories of 1999 came back, with an English team snatching the trophy from Die Roten.  There was talk of change, but for me only one change has to be made—Gomez.  Get a clinical forward and Bayern can truly threaten the big boys and be yearly threat.  That is all.

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A couple of pods regarding Manchester United and Juventus.

Bobby and Eddie at the Manchester United Redcast were like me in that they started to believe at 85 minutes and then the moment, and the championship, was gone. They moved on to discuss how MUFC might respond to another challenger like Blackburn, like Arsenal, like Chelsea. They finished with a hope that Chelsea would win so that the Reds could poach Tottenham players.

The gang at Juventiknows got the pod back together to discuss the scudetto victory.  They led off in terms of belief and where everyone celebrated the championship before moving on to praise for Conte and his preparation and flexible tactics.  The next topic was the transfer policy of Marotta for this season and looking ahead to what they need for next (ie Pirlo replacement).  They wrapped up with thoughts on next season, with more games and more expectations.

Paolo Bandini reviewed a Coppa Italia full of storylines—Juventus’ bid for an unbeaten double, Del Piero’s last game for Juve, and Napoli’s run at their first piece of silverware since Maradona.  In the end, Napoli ran out 2-0 winners and now face the future, knowing that key players could move on.

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Uli Hesse wrote a great column about the final weekend in Germany, with results from the playoffs and the German Cup Final, where Dortmund thrashed Bayern Munich 5-2.  This result was the fifth straight win over the German power and was the most goals Die Roten have every given up in a final.  Uli kept with the stats with this stunner: Unless the French Ligue 1 produces 167 goals on its final matchday, the Bundesliga is once more the highest-scoring of the major European leagues – for the 22nd year in row!

Strip Club–Private Dance Edition

Juventus_team_2001_02

2002 was one of the peaks of my football consumption. My wife and I had been married just over a year as that season came to a close, and we had rented the upstairs of a house in downtown Lansing that was, how shall we say, quaint, but it had cable, including Fox Soccer Channel, and that’s all that mattered to me.  Cable was a luxury that would be sacrificed after the birth of our child and moving into a house of our own.

The run-in to that season saw Arsenal stun United at Old Trafford 1-0 to win the title; Valencia win La Liga for the first time since 1971; Real Madrid crush Leverkusen’s dreams hopes for European glory with a memorable strike from Zidane; but most of all it saw Juventus go for the double in Italy.

david_trezeguet

Heading into that campaign, the Old Lady strengthened their squad by signing Buffon, Thuram, Nedved, and Salas (totally forgot he played for Juve), adding to David Trezeguet the year before. Without a title since 1998, Juventus won their 26th Scudetto after Inter threw it away on the last day of the season. Led by Trezeguet’s 24 goals, the Bianconeri nearly won the double, falling to Parma on away goals in the Coppa Italia Final after winning 2-1 in Turin and losing 1-0 at the Tardini. In the Champions League they breezed through the opening group stage (remember the five minutes in Champions League history when there were two group stages before the quarters?) before being drawn into a tough with Bayer Leverkusen, Deportivo La Coruna and Arsenal. Look at the final table and how competitive it was.

Team

Pld

W

D

L

GF

GA

GD

Pts

 Bayer Leverkusen

6

3

1

2

11

11

0

10

 Deportivo La Coruña

6

3

1

2

7

6

+1

10

 Arsenal

6

2

1

3

8

8

0

7

 Juventus

6

2

1

3

7

8

−1

7

Bayer would go on to the final and Arsenal won the Premier League, while Depor would fall to Manchester United. Earning one point against Depor is what scuppered the Old Lady’s chances of progression.

juve away 2003

I couldn’t find a clean pic of the jersey (see above for a pic that I took), much less in long sleeves, so I refer to you to Colours of Football.

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I really hated the kits of the Lotto years (the only other one Lotto got right was the silver jersey of 2000-01), but I remember seeing Juventus run out against Celtic in the all black strip, and I was instantly in lust.  Anyway, what a game, 4-3 to the Scottish team. I found this highlights package, including the goals and the panel remembering that night.  Tough loss but what a game and what an atomsphere.

The jersey was great, with the Lotto patches on the sleeves usually looking out of place, but, in this case, providing a nice accent. The jersey held up well after ten years and I loved wearing it on cool nights. My only complaint is that the cuffs were too big. This one became another victim of my kit purge and I passed it on to Peter Alegri, a lifetime Juventino. Forza Juve!!