Posts Tagged ‘ adidas ’

Juventus Home Shirt 08/09

Juventus’ first season back after the Calciopoli scandal was a relative success, with the Old Lady finishing third and qualifying for the Champions League. The following season, the club improved on their position while giving a good account of themselves in Europe.

The playing staff saw turnover ahead of the 2008/09 campaign with Birindelli leaving the club after a decade of service and almost 300 appearances. Zalayeta also departed, although his career never hit the anticipated heights. To help reinforce the squad, Mellberg, Amauri, and Poulsen were signed and Marchisio and Giovinco returned from loan.

The Bianconeri challenged for the scudetto before falling away in the spring, which eventually cost Ranieri his job. Alessandro Del Piero led the way with 13 league goals, supported by Amauri and Iaquinta, with Trezeguet out for most of the season. In the Coppa Italia, Juventus overcame Catania and Napoli before losing out to Lazio in the Semi-Finals. The Biancocelesti would go on to win their fifth Coppa title.

Juve were back in the Champions League and, after breezing through the Qualifying Round (5-1 over Artmedia Petržalka), the Bianconeri met Real Madrid on Match Days 3 and 4, winning both matches. The Old Lady won the home match 2-1 and then went to the Bernabeu where Alessandro Del Piero turned in a performance for the ages, scoring both goals. The Black and Whites topped the group but fell to Chelsea in the Round of 16.

Juventus 2-1

Real Madrid 0-2 Juventus

Moving on to the kits, Nike took over the contract for the Italian club in 2003 and had it until adidas became the manufacturer in 2015. This one was a solid effort, not the best but far from the worst, with the 06/07 and 14/15 versions the best in my opinion.

Juventus’ traditional black and white stripes were accented by bright yellow accents at the collar, cuffs and bottom hem. Yellow was used instead of the red from the previous season and I preferred this look, so much that I bought a replica version. The cuffs and hem were particularly interesting as the yellow bits were sown on under the main fabric to create a flare effect. There several different iterations of the kit as it was worn with white shorts and socks, white shorts and black socks and black shorts and socks. Have to say I liked this last version the best.

The replica had an embroidered crest with a thick heat transfer of the New Holland logo. There were some additional touches with the word BIANCONERI and two stars on the inside neck tape and JUVENTUS in gold across back neck.

As I was researching I noted that the league version of the shirt had stripes throughout the back of the shirt while the Champions League version had a black box for the name and number set. At first I thought I was imagining things but the Switch Image Project confirmed this slight alteration.

I ordered this shirt with JUNIOR 7 on the back. While I don’t wear it as much as I used to (read why here), it still hangs in my closet and maybe one day I’ll get it framed for the mancave I dream/talk about.

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Resources

Wikipedia

Colours of Football

Switch Image Project

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Check out more posts on kits from clubs and countries around the world on the Strip Club page. And yes. It’s safe for work.

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MLS Kits 2017

Get the podcast here: MLS Kits 2017

JR Francis (@paynomind on twitter) came back on the #SoccerNomad podcast to look at the kits for the 2017 MLS season. Our conversation covered a lot of ground and pulled references both far and wide. Hope you enjoy our conversation.

Resources

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Thanks for listening! You can also subscribe via iTunes and please leave a rating and review. Follow me on twitter @austinlong1974.

Seattle Sounders Change Shirt 2013 and 2014

The Seattle Sounders entered their fifth season looking to reach MLS Cup after falling just short the previous season. Sigi Schmid was still at the helm and the roster received a little bit of a shake up with star forward Fredy Montero going out on loan to Sporting Club de Portugal and an influx of several new players. DeAndre Yedlin, Lamar Neagle, Shalrie Joseph, and Obafemi Martins joined the team ahead of the season, with US international Clint Dempsey signed in August.

The Sounders finished fourth in the Western Conference for the 2013 campaign, just one point above the red line. Poor performances bookended their season, as Seattle picked up only two points from the opening five matches and the closed the season with three draws and four losses. On the plus side, CenturyLink Field was a fortress as the team won ten, drew five and only lost twice at home. Seattle beat Colorado Rapids in the 4/5 play in game to set up a match with Cascadia rivals and #1 seed Portland Timbers. A 2-1 home loss was followed by a 3-2 loss at Jeld-Wen and the Sounders were out of the playoffs again.

Seattle did not find success in the Lamar Hunt US Open Cup, losing at the first hurdle away to Tampa Bay 1-0. A Cascadia Cup triumph eluded the Sounders as well as they finished third with Vancouver Whitecaps claiming the trophy.

Eddie Johnson led the team with 12 goals in all competitions and Mauro Rosales chipped in with eight assists. Michael Gspurning had 11 clean sheets in 33 appearances. In terms of appearances, the Sounders usually lined up as follows:

1          GK      Gspurning

2          RB       Yedlin

34        CB       Hurtado

19        CB       Traoré

12        LB       González

6          DM      Alonso

10        RM      Rosales

3          AM      Evans

27        LM      Neagle

7          SS        Johnson

9          CF       Martins

 

(image courtesy of Colours of Football)

Seattle’s official colors are Sounder Blue, Rave Green, and Cascade Shale and adidas introduced a Cascade Shale away shirt in 2011. Seeing the shirt in an official Sounder store during my trip to Seattle, I was intrigued by the design, with the Cascade Shale base trimmed in Rave Green and highlighted by the silver Powerweb bands which was a feature of adidas’ Techfit kits at the time.

(image courtesy of Colours of Football)

For the 2013 season, adidas used the same Cascade Shale background and Rave Green was used for the adidas branding on shirt and shorts and to outline the chest. The key design feature was a vertical two tone bar of Sounder Blue and Rave Green. Per the club’s official release:

The secondary kit continues in cascade shale with the addition of a two inch vertical stripe which connects team colors through a mosaic design to emphasize the team’s unique and diverse fan base.

One thing that Seattle Sounders blog Sounders at Heart mentioned was  

this feature is vastly different in the “replica” kits being sold through the team store; only green is present in those versions.

Images on the internet were inconclusive, plus I couldn’t find it on Classic Football Shirts or even on eBay. Is that weird? Anyway, I really like this look and saw a fan wearing the shirt at the Terminus Legion MLS Cup 2016 Watch Party. I complimented him on his jersey,  and I’m hoping the club return to this color scheme in the near future, staying away from Super Cyan, Electric Yellow and Pacific Blue.

What do you think of the shirt? What are your favorite MLS shirts of all time? Let me know if the comments below.

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Check out more posts on kits from clubs and countries around the world on the Strip Club page. And yes. It’s safe for work.

Kits, Shoes, Tactics and Team of the Tournament (World Cup 2002) Part 2

698px-2002_fifa_world_cup_logo-svg

Kits

brazil-kit

The big performance feature of the tournament was a mesh panel over a sewn in base layer. Adidas went for contrasting colors on some shirts which worked with most jerseys except for the white ones, with France and China coming to mind. Nike’s template saw an angled chest section accented with several different features: contrasting colored triangles at the collarbone and rib cage panels, raglan sleeves and a mixture of collars.

cameroon

Of course the most unique kit had to have been Cameroon, which saw sleeves sewn into a tank top designed kit in order to meet FIFA regulations. Germany wore the same kit (white shirt, black shorts, white socks) in every match. I owned the Nigeria home shirt from this competition for while but eventually got rid of it. My post on the shirt and the Super Eagles tournament can be found here.

For full pics, please check out Historical Football Kits World Cup 2002 page and, for informed analysis on kit design, listen to the Football Attic Kit podcast dedicated to the tournament.

Shoes

predator-mania

On the shoe front adidas had recently released the Predator Mania ahead of the tournament. The shoe was much less stylized than the previous versions and didn’t have the fins. A traditional looking boot, the tongue was held in place with an elastic band that went under the shoe, and blades rather than studs were used and the shoe featured a heel cup.

02_2002mercvapor_2_native_1600

Nike continued on with their Mercurial Vapor line and launched it with the famous Secret Tournament campaign. Focusing on making the lightest boot possible, the outsole was made of a synthetic material called Nike Skin. The shoe also contained an external heel counter and a “glass” filled outsole called NikeFrame.

Tactics

I couldn’t find much in the way of tactical innovations so I focused on the US v Mexico Round of 16 game and the winners of the tournament.

usa-mexico-2-0

I had it stuck in my brain that Claudio Reyna played some sort of RBW/RM but didn’t know if that was right or why one of the most technical players in the US Soccer history was manning the channels. Research proved that I remember correctly and this position was the result of squad changes. Bruce Arena rolled out a 3-5-2 against their CONCACAF rivals. Friedel was between the sticks with Berhalter, Pope and Sanneh in a three man back line with Mastroeni back in the squad to help clog the middle. Lewis and Reyna played wing back to provide defensive cover and O’Brien and Donovan started and linked the attack, which was led by Wolff and McBride. The US gave up possession but kept Mexico at arm’s length, only giving up one shot. An early goal from McBride allowed a dogged organization to take over and the United States saw off Mexico. This tactical tweak secured the result for the Stars and Stripes and added another Dos a Cero to the rivalry.

(Thanks to MLS Soccer and US Soccer for resources.)

brazil_2002_world_cup_rivaldo_ronaldo_ronaldinho

As for Brazil, everyone remembers an awesome attack of the three R’s but the midfield corps was disrupted by an injury to Emerson before the tournament and a change by Scolari in the knockout stages. Michael Cox of Zonal Marking examined the team and saw the Seleccao move from a midfield of Emerson and Juninho Paulista to a midfield of Gilberto Silva and Juninho Paulista, who was then replaced by Kleberson. The result was a 3-4-1-2 with a back three of Lucio, Edmilson and Roque Juinor and Cafu and Roberto Carlos as wingbacks. Ronaldinho took the ball off the back line and got it up to Rivaldo and Ronaldo. Not really a tactical innovation by Scolari but one that got Brazil’s World Cup Qualification back on track, maximized his player pool and captured the country’s fifth title.

Team of the Tournament

Reviewing the Team of the Tournament, the memories came flooding back. Kahn was a beast but had an unfortunate moment in the Final. Rustu would get a cup of coffee at Barcelona but spent most of his career in Turkey. Hong Myung Bo was a rock in the back for the hosts. The three R’ed attack of Brazil was a sight to behold. I loved Hasan Sas and actually created a player based on him for a FIFA game. And of course who could forget El Hadji Diouf. The Senegalese striker had a great summer but a series of terrible spells followed in England afterwards.

Goalkeepers: Oliver Kahn (Germany); Rustu Recber (Turkey)

Defenders: Roberto Carlos (Brazil); Sol Campbell (England); Hong Myung Bo (South Korea); Alpay Ozalan (Turkey); Fernando Hierro (Spain)

Midfielders: Rivaldo, Ronaldinho (Brazil); Claudio Reyna (United States); Michael Ballack (Germany); Yoo Sang Chul (South Korea)

Forwards: Ronaldo (Brazil); El Hadji Diouf (Senegal); Hasan Sas (Turkey); Miroslav Klose (Germany)

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All in all, a strange tournament due to the timing and multiple locations but one that I will remember for the United States’ fine performance and exposure to new teams like Senegal, Turkey and South Korea. Kit game wasn’t that strong but some of the goals were quite tasty.

Read Part 1 here and check out more posts on my trips, research and memories on the MatchDay Memories page.

History of Bayern Munich home shirts

bayern-1974

If I had to do life over again, I may have followed the Bundesliga instead of the EPL. Doesn’t address supporting my own domestic league, but that’s a discussion for a different day. Incredible teams, passionate fan support and amazing players. Historically Bayern Munich are the top dogs and from what I knew, they had always worn red home shirts, hence the name Die Roten. But one day I read this post from Museum of Jerseys, clicked on a link and my mind was blown.

bayern-munich-shirts

Fußball-Club Bayern München started with a sky blue shirt and white shorts. Think about that. Sky blue. A post from Bundesliga Fanatic mentions:

. . . “in the club constitution a genuine Bavarian color scheme was mandated. The founders of Bayern settled on white shirts & blue shorts. The only problem: It was impossible to purchase blue shorts during the early 1900s, therefore Bayern was forced to wear black shorts which they called “darkblue.””

bavarian-flag

After two seasons the Bavarians changed to a white shirt with black shorts, and following a merger with Münchner Sport-Club (MSC) in 1906, the club changed to a strip of a white shirt and maroon shorts and this combo lasted until 1927 except for a short interval featuring a shirt with light blue and maroon stripes from 1909 to 1912.

bayern-munich-shirts

The 1927/28 season saw the introduction of a white and maroon striped shirt with maroon shorts which morphed into a white shirt with maroon sleeves and maroon shorts that was worn from 1931 to 1955. Looks fantastic. A kit of a maroon shirt and black shorts took over for two seasons before 1957/58 saw the return of white, with either a mostly white shirt or a white shirt with maroon sleeves, both worn with maroon shorts.

In 1968 everything changed. For one season the German club wore blue and red vertical stripes with blue shorts. It was an echo of the kits used from 1909 to 1912 and very similar to Barca’s strip. The following seasons of 1969-1973 saw a red and white shirt with red shorts (white shorts in 1970/71). The trefoil and three stripes of adidas were added to the shorts in 1971. Another one off shirt was worn in 1973/74 as the Reds wore a white shirt with a thin horizontal stripe of red and blue opposite the club badge with white shorts.

bayern-munich-shirts

In 1974 the club adopted the rich red shirt that I associate with the club. That year also saw the adidas logo appear on the shirt with the wordmark across the chest, the trefoil opposite the club badge, and the three stripes down the sleeves. As far as I can tell adidas and Bayern Munich have the longest running partnership between manufacturer and club, and adidas even picked up a small percentage of shares in the club in 2002.

An all red strip with varying design elements was worn until 1991 with an all white strip in 1977/78 being the outlier. 1991 saw the emergence of the adidas Equipment branding and the use of blue on Bayern shirts for the first time in 20 years. Three diagonal bars were seen on the shoulder opposite the crest and on the shorts. For the 1993/94 and 1994/95 season, things went one step further with the same template and the addition of blue sleeves. In 1995, the red/blue vertical stripes re-appeared with a white collar. 1997 saw the first predominantly blue jersey since the original days of the club and in a much darker hue. Big red bands broke up the navy blue diamond shadow pattern.

1991-1993-h 1993-1995-h 1995-1996-h 1997-1999-h

Images via Die Grosse Fussball Sammelalben

The 1999/00 season saw red return as the main color, although the shirts for the 2001/02 and 2002/03 seasons were more of the historic maroon with charcoal sleeves and shorts. Horizontal red and white stripes got a look from 2007 to 2009. The stripes went vertical for the 2010/11 season in homage to shirts from the early 70s.

1999-2001-h2001-2001-h2003-2004-h2005-2006-h2007-2008-h2009-2010-h

Images via Die Grosse Fussball Sammelalben

For the 2011/12 and 2012/13 seasons, Die Roten wore an all red kit with gold trim. This looks really good and is one of favorites. White replaced gold the following season and adidas added a diamond shadow print, similar to the crest in the body of the shirt for another really nice design. The 2014/15 campaign saw the return of the blue and red vertical stripes. White was used as the accent color on the ring collar, stripes on the shoulders, cuffs and down the torso.

2011-2012-hbayern-munich-14-15

An all red kit was present for the 2015/16 season as adidas used a darker red on the collar, brand markings, cuffs and waist to complement the traditional red. The 2016/17 shirt is all red with horizontal stripes of a very subtle contrasting red, a full collar with red buttons on a white plaquet.

bayern-munich-15-16bayern-munich-16-17

Where the club and adidas go from here is anyone’s guess. I would love to see the white shirt with either maroon trim or sleeves. Thinking Arsenal’s away shirt from 2007/08. Anyway, I hope you have enjoyed this look at Bayern Munich home shirts. I learned a lot about the club and found some really interesting designs.

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Resources for this post:

Special thanks to Denis Hurley of Museum of Jerseys for his help on this project.

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Read the rest of my Strip Club posts here and follow me on twitter @austinlong1974.

Arsenal Kit Pod

sam-collection

Arsenal Kit Pod

My brother Sam came back on the SoccerNomad podcast to discuss his Arsenal kit collection and Gunner kits through the years. We talked about the best and the worst, unicorn kits and more.

Images of kits we discussed:

FAVES

arsenal-70s

Arsenal's Thierry Henry celebrates at the end of the game after the 1-0 win against Southampton

away-88-89

WANT LIST

arsenal-70s

arsenal-125

arsenal-98-99-away

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

WORST

bruised-banana

mid-90s-change  purple-reignblue-bottle   15-16-3rd

 16-17-third

Arsenal kit history resources

Historical Football Kits

Design Football pods

the-arsenal-shirt

The Arsenal Shirt: Iconic match worn shirts from the history of the Gunners by James Elkin (Author) and Simon Shakeshaft (Author)

Museum of Jerseys blog

SoccerNomad blog posts

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Thanks for listening! You can also subscribe via iTunes and please leave a rating and review. Follow me on twitter @austinlong1974.

ATL Gooners

atl-gooners

SoccerNomad podcast: ATL Gooners

Some of the Atlanta Gooners came on the SoccerNomad podcast to talk about the Supporters Group and the club. From the 2016 Summer Tour to Highbury to the classic Manchester United/Arsenal games of the late 90s/early 2000s to kits, we covered a lot of ground and had a great conversation.

Find out more about the group on their various platforms:

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Learn more about Arsenal Football Club from the following resources:

Books

  • Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby
  • Invincible by Amy Lawrence
  • Addicted by Tony Adams

Blogs

SoccerNomad Blog posts on Arsenal

Arsenal America Supporter Groups

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Thanks for listening! You can also subscribe via iTunes and please leave a rating and review. Follow me on twitter @austinlong1974.