Holland Euro 2012 away kit

The Netherlands made the World Cup Final in 2010, narrowly losing to Spain in a match possibly more remembered for Nigel De Jong’s foot to Xabi Alonso’s sternum than the finish by Iniesta and the crowning glory of La Furia Roja. Following that defeat, the Oranje breezed through Euro 2012 Qualifying, only losing one match to Sweden after qualification had already been secured, and during the run they climbed to #1 in FIFA World Rankings.

Heading into the Euros, co-hosted by Ukraine and Poland, manager Bert van Marwijk had re-shaped the squad with about a third of the squad turned over. The Dutch rolled out a back line of van der Wiel, Heitinga, Vlaar and Willems with Mathijsen getting some time as well. The attacking group in the first two games featured Robben, Sneijder, Afellay and van Persie with de Jong and van Bommel holding.

After dropping their first two games, Holland could still advance and put most of their key attackers on the field with Van der Vaart and Huntelaar coming on and van Bommel and Afellay heading to the bench. An early goal gave hope to the Oranje but two goals from Cristiano Ronaldo saw the Dutch finish 0-3 and in last place.

As for the kits, the home shirt featured a two tone orange pattern that I didn’t care for and I loved the change shirt from Nike the moment I saw it. I love all black kits and this one by Nike was fantastic. The small deep orange band that came down the shirt provided a nice accent to the shirt while keeping the manufacturer logo in the same color as the shirt. Plus the KNVB badge was not framed in that weird shield used in previous iterations.

The Dutch wore the all black strip for the last group game and the shirt features a black ring collar, rubberized material at the seams and around the orange design feature, laser cut venting around the rib cage and a ventilated back. Nieuwe Meesters (New Masters) is on the inside neck and the bright Dutch orange is on the inside of the cuffs.

Another item I came across in my research was the name and number set. The name font is pretty common for the time but the numbers are quite, how do i say this, blocky. This image from the Switch Image Project shows what I’m talking about.
Despite my kit buying rules, when I saw a deal on Classic Football Shirts on the authentic version, I had to get it. I ordered a medium (maybe not a good long term decision as I age and put on the pounds) and it’s wonderful, bold shirt that weighs almost nothing.

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Resources

Football Shirt Culture

Historical Football Kits

Colours of Football

Wikipedia

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Check out more posts on kits from clubs and countries around the world on the Strip Club page. And yes. It’s safe for work.

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  1. Somehow this kit escaped my notice. It’s great and, like you, I’m a sucker for a black kit. But the “blocky” numbers aren’t great I have to say.

  2. The numbers are different, with a kind of 80s feel to them. Like them as a one off, probably not all the time though.

  3. Bad memories to this kit. The gaffer tape on the orange patch was novel, but it should really have been used to pick out the FA’s logo rather than the Nike swoosh.

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